GOVERNMENT MUST LISTEN BEFORE VOTING BILL IS SCUPPERED

15th November 2010

The Member of Parliament for the West Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Constituency of St Ives, Andrew George, has warned the Government that it risks undermining its own proposed legislation on voting and constituency boundary reform if it remains inflexible to reasonable change.

Mr George, who has proposed a number of amendments to the Parliamentary Voting and Constituencies Bill during its passage through the Commons believes that the Government faces the possibility of the effective wrecking of the Bill in the House of Lords in view of its significant constitutional implications.

The Second Reading of the Bill will take place in the Lords today.

Mr George said, “If the Lords refer the Bill to a Select Committee for review this will effectively wreck the AV referendum planned for next May. This could be avoided if the Government stopped being so intransigent about its inflexible plans for constituency boundary change but instead allowed the Boundary Commission greater discretion and flexibility along the lines that I and others had proposed in the debate in the Commons”.

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